You will be redirected back to your article in seconds
Skip to main content

Boyish Sets New Targets Aligned with UN’s Sustainable Development Goals

While sustainability is no longer a siloed concern, the industry has yet to make it a true priority when weighing important business decisions. Sign up for our webinar "Viewing Sustainability Like an Investor: Weighing Progress and Profit" on Nov 22 to learn key metrics to keep consumers, your company and Wall Street happy.

Known for its commitment to the environment, Boyish Jeans is raising the bar on its own sustainable practices. The Los Angeles-based denim brand announced new goals based on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) as well as plans to offer more sizes in its recently published annual sustainability report.

Of the 17 SDGs, Boyish is centering its attention on six goals. SDG 14, life below water; and SDG 15, life on land, are some of the main areas of focus for the brand as it continues to source alternative components and methods that help reduce its impact on the environment.

As a champion of fibers such as organic cotton, Tencel  and Tencel x Refibra lyocell, Boyish pledges that all of its products will be made from plant-based fibers by 2023. “We want to make sure all of our clothes are made with circularity in mind and can be worn for years to come—that’s why we want to focus on using only plant-based fibers,” the brand stated in the report.

Living wages are also a part of the brand’s latest targets, following a report from nonprofit organization Business and Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC) showing rampant wage theft connected to 16 of the most profitable fashion brands. By 2023, 100 percent of Boyish teams will meet or exceed living wage. The brand already conducted research at its factories to ensure all employees make at least minimum wage, and joined the #LowestWageChallenge designed to showcase the lowest wage at its factories before the project was postponed due to the pandemic.

SDG 10, reduce inequalities, is inspiring the brand to accommodate more sizes, an initiative that is increasingly being echoed throughout the apparel industry. As a whole, the fashion industry is placing a greater emphasis on size inclusivity, with Edited data showing an 11 percent increase in the number of new plus-size or curve styles compared to 2019.

Boyish said it plans to expand its core collection to include extended sizing as well as petite, curvy and tall fits. The brand has not yet confirmed the exact size range. Through this promise, it aims to be the “go-to sustainable denim company for everyone.”

The spotlight on racial injustice in 2020 led Boyish to examine its own diversity efforts, and it vowed to do better. Following SDG 5, gender inequality; SDG 8, decent work and economic growth; and SDG 10, reduced inequalities, the brand will increase diversity in all parts of the business, from internal teams to the partners it works with. It is also casting women of color for all collections and donating to organizations that support women of color.

Jordan Nodarse, founder of Boyish Jeans, is optimistic about meeting the new targets, noting a collective shift in consumer mindset in 2020.

“People stopped their busy lives and thought differently about the status quo and with this we hope comes great change for the better of our planet,” he said in the report.

Along with making strides in sustainability, Boyish is also working on translating those efforts into terms that everyone can understand. In 2020, it added supply-chain tracing company Retraced GmbH’s blockchain-based transparency plugin to its e-commerce website and partnered with sustainability metrics company GreenStory to calculate and analyze its environmental footprint.

According to the report, in 2020, Boyish planted 14,132 trees and saved more than 3 million days of drinking water, 29,000 miles of emissions, 591 pounds of waste from the landfill and 187,018 square feet of pesticide-free land.