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Devil-Dog Dungarees Donates $25K to Wounded Warrior Project

From new denim constructions, weights and washes to the steps global mills are taking to reduce impact, Rivet's SS23 In Season Look Book: Denim & Trims has everything you need to know for a successful denim season.

Though the Covid-19 pandemic has inspired companies throughout the fashion industry to support vulnerable communities, some denim brands have been doing so long before the global crisis exposed a dire need.

General Sportwear-owned denim brand Devil-Dog Dungarees recently donated $25,000 to its charitable partner Wounded Warrior Project (WWP), bringing its total contribution to $100,000. When the brand relaunched two years ago, it began its partnership with WWP and has periodically donated lump sums not tied to sales ever since.

In addition to donations, the men’s brand offers a 20 percent military discount for active duty, retirees, veterans and military spouses and family, and shows its ongoing support by attaching its signature dog tag featuring the WWP logo to each pair of jeans it produces.

WWP offers a variety of programs, services and events for wounded veterans of the military actions following Sept. 11, 2001. The nonprofit underscores the brand’s rich military history, as founder Louis Rosenstock originally launched Devil-Dog in 1948 with the tagline “Tough as a Marine” to honor the U.S. armed forces. Today, it’s led by Rosenstock’s grandchildren, David Rosenstock, executive vice president and owner at General Sportwear and Jeff Rosenstock, president of General Sportwear.

“We are proud to partner with WWP and continue our grandfather’s legacy of honoring the brave Americans who have served our country,” the General Sportwear president said. “It’s important to us and our customers to recognize the good work that WWP does to empower wounded veterans.”

Though Devil-Dog launched in 1948, it shut down in the 1960s as General Sportwear pivoted to creating private labels for major retailers. In 2019, the parent company resurrected the brand with a direct-to-consumer approach and dropped a line of 16 jeans and nine T-shirts. The brand says it’s currently exploring future WWP initiatives for 2022.