You will be redirected back to your article in seconds
Skip to main content

Intermix Calls for Consumers to Recycle Their Jeans

Rivet’s 2021 winter issue has dropped! This in-depth issue examines the steps the global denim industry is taking to minimize its impact on the environment, from implementing zero waste production and design processes to establishing greenhouse gas emissions goals aligned with the Paris Agreement.

Along with selling new jeans, retailers are increasingly becoming hubs to collect unwanted jeans from consumers. Intermix, the U.S. boutique chain Gap Inc. sold to private equity firm Altamont Capital Partners in May, is the latest to join Cotton Incorporated’s Blue Jeans Go Green efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle.

Last week, Intermix kicked off the Intermix for Good Tour, a nationwide sustainability platform that combines “reducing waste through denim recycling and bringing communities together through giving back.” Customers can receive 20 percent off a new denim purchase by bringing an old pair of jeans into any of Intermix’s 31 locations.

The jeans will be recycled through Cotton’s Blue Jeans Go Green program, which has recycled almost 4 million pieces of jeans since its inception in 2006. The program transforms jeans into new productions like building insulation, thermal packaging insulation and pet bed inserts.

Additionally, the Intermix for Good Tour will be partnering with three denim brands for a beach and community clean up in cities across the U.S. The first clean-up event took place in Venice Beach, Calif. with Re/Done, which recently launched its first collection of jeans following the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Jeans Redesign guidelines for circularity.

Related Stories

A second clean-up event will take place in South Beach, Fla., with Retrifete on Oct. 23. The final clean-up event will take place in New York City on Oct. 30 with Agolde.

Though Intermix is known for its hyper-local product assortments, sustainability is a constant. Jyothi Rao, Intermix CEO, said the company is “committed to incorporating more eco-friendly practices in our business.”

“We have always been a destination for the best pair of denim, and with this initiative, we’re extending the lifecycle of your pair of jeans and proving that style and sustainability can co-exist,” Rao added.

Intermix’s program follows the launch of teen specialty retailer Pacsun’s PacDenim For A Better Tomorrow. The initiative with Blue Jeans Go Green incentivizes customers to drop off used denim made with at least 90 percent cotton or greater to receive $10 off their next denim purchase.

More partners mean Blue Jeans Go Green’s sustainable message is reaching more demographics.

“Intermix connotes an authority on fashion while placing a priority on sustainability, demonstrated through their commitment to natural fibers and collaborations that make a positive impact on the environment,” said Andrea Samber, director, brand partnerships at Cotton Incorporated. “We are thrilled to have consumers help transform their old, worn denim into something new as part of the the Intermix for Good Tour.”