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Outland Denim Is Feeling Peachy About Clay-Dyed Jeans

The denim industry’s quest for unconventional natural dyes marches on. The latest concept, clay-dyed jeans, comes from B Corp-certified label Outland Denim.

The Australian brand’s Peachy Keen collection drops this month, offering a 100 percent organic cotton straight fit jean, mini skirt, and shorts with a washed-out, vintage-looking peachy pigment.

Made in partnership with denim mill Maritaş Denim, the color is achieved with Turkey-sourced clay using a natural dye technique dating back to ancient times before the 19th century rise of synthetic dyes. The process, according to Outland, uses 72 percent less water during the dyeing process compared to synthetic dyes and results in lower carbon emissions.

In 2019, Maritaş Denim introduced Terra Denim made with clay-based pigments.

The Peachy Keen collection launches Feb. 12. Consumers signed up for a waitlist on Outland Denim’s website will be allowed to access the collection a couple days earlier.

The capsule is flanked by Outland’s Winter 2022 collection that includes black overalls and boyfriend jeans made with organic cotton and Refibra-blended fabrics, organic cotton chambray tops and ready-to-wear pieces made from Ecovero.

Innovations in natural dyes are growing. Stony Creek’s natural indigo is also gaining traction, thanks in part to a pilot with Levi’s and support from sustainable fashion incubator Fashion For Good.

Companies, however, are looking beyond tried-and-true blue.

Artistic Milliners introduced sustainable dyestuff made using dye derived from colorful soils. The Purecolor range offered seven colors, spanning a soft earthy red to light blue and brown with gray undertones.

Archroma’s EarthColors, a range of dyes derived from natural waste products, have become the go-to solution for mills and brands seeking sustainable ways to add color to their denim assortments. The dyes are the foundation to Orta’s vegan denim collection featuring Earth-derived colors such as sand, forest, clay and henna.

Italian tech firm Tonello stepped into the space with Wake, a 100 percent eco-sustainable dyeing system using only organic and compostable raw materials. The process dye garments with plant and vegetable waste from flowers, berries and roots dried and infused without chemical additives.