Facebook Pinterest Search Icon SourcingJournal_horiz Tumbler Twitter Shape photo-camera graph-trend Shape latest-news icon / user

Isko Debuts Sustainable Cotton Face Mask

Where are fashion’s priorities? How sustainability will fare post pandemic is just one of many open questions. Join SJ on July 15 at 11 am for a webinar on how the crisis will affect future sourcing decisions and how to better measure progress.

The maker of jeggings, “denim fur” and Nordic Swan Ecolabel and EU Ecolabel award-winning fabrics is now in the business of making sustainable protective face masks.

Denim mill Isko recently introduced Isko Vital, a reusable and washable mask for up to 15 times. The simple white mask is made from soft organic cotton providing comfort, breathability and protection against most viruses, bacteria and dust. Isko Vital is also water repellent.

The masks, which retail for 3.49 euros (approximately $4), are tested and meet the European performance requirements of medical face masks Type-I. The Turkey-based mill, which doesn’t typically sell products directly to consumers, has set up the Iskovital.com website where shoppers can purchase the masks.

Isko, which has not shut down its production during the pandemic, is among the mills and denim manufacturers from around the world that have pivoted their production to personal protective equipment (PPE). The mill has continued to move ahead with the production of its Fall/Winter 21-22 collection while also developing much-needed protective gear like face masks.

As a result, no employee has been laid off during this critical time and all paychecks have been issued regularly with no delay. Isko’s parent company, Sanko Group, has also provided an additional financial contribution to all 14,000 employees as further support in order to offer some relief from the economic pressure due to the outbreak.

Elsewhere in the world, Cone Denim, Kaltex and Vidalia Mills are among the denim mills in North America that have been producing masks and hospital gown for hospitals and essential workers helping to slow down the spread of the coronavirus. In March, Cone debuted mask kits with its sister company, Burlington, on its White Oak Shop and quickly sold out.

Meanwhile, denim manufacturers in L.A. like Mother Denim, Hudson Jeans and Citizens of Humanity have converted their jeans production to making masks from deadstock fabrics.

Related Articles

More from our brands

Access exclusive content Become a Member Today!