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Denim and Fur are Having a Mixed-Media Moment at Coterie

When it’s deliver-or-die, supply chains become the lifeblood of a company. To that end, the fashion industry has embraced technology to navigate today’s hyper-complicated supply chain, with myriad solutions shaping the first, middle and last mile. Call it Sourcing 2.0.

Denim has long been–and will continue to be–a wardrobe staple, but now the mixed-media trend is giving fashion denim a bit of fun and glamour with the inclusion of fur.

Oxan Inc., through its core Autunno fur and leather label, was showing jean jackets mixed with real fur—made of fox, mink and raccoon—at the Coterie Show at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in Manhattan this week. One denim jacket had a black Persian lamb collar and cuffs. Others went distressed with body-lined fur options or fur trim just at the collar. Retail price points started at $295.

While mixed-media has been in fashion for the last 15 to 20 years, Oxan founder Emre Oksan, said he only began including denim in September with the introduction of two styles and he’s since expanded to six. The company makes its jean jackets in Turkey, using denim manufactured in Turkey, and the fur options are sourced from Spain, Italy, Finland and New Zealand.

Denim and Fur are Having a
Looks from Oxan Inc.’s Autunno label. George Chinsee

For the contemporary fashionista that wants the glam, without real fur, Sanctuary Clothing offered two jean jackets with a faux fur collar and a body-liner that could be zipped out. One faux fur option featured a trendy leopard print that wholesaled for $49, or about $159 at retail.

Denim and Fur are Having a
Jean jackets from Sanctuary Clothing, including its faux fur, body-lined option. George Chinsee

At Driftwood Jeans, much of the fashion denim included colorful, embroidered floral patterns, whether down a sleeve or the side of a jean leg. Simpler styles featured colorful stitching down the side of a full-length jean or pair of shorts. Some of the shorts also featured a tribal-effect embroidered stripe down the leg.

“Everybody wants something different to sell,” Randi Goldman, the sales representative for Driftwood, said. “Sixty percent of the line has the embroidery. The rest is on-trend novelty.”

For spring and summer, buyers’ favorites included flared hemlines and crops with wide, embroidered patterns at the hemlines. Both the jeans and jackets had wholesale price points ranging from $53 to $78.

Denim and Fur are Having a
A close-up of the embroidered detailing from Driftwood Jeans. George Chinsee