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The Early 2000s Scarf Top Is Back

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Scarves are not only being used to cover mouths and noses this summer.

Recent data from global fashion search platform Lyst show that the scarf top—an early 2000s style popularized by the era’s pop stars like Christina Aguilera and Destiny’s Child—is making a play for a 2020 comeback.

Scarves’ status as a fashion item has steadily ascended in the past year as neckerchiefs and headbands became en vogue last summer, and as consumers sought alternatives to wearing traditional face masks during the pandemic.

But the warm weather appears to have kicked demand for scarves into high gear. During the week of July 8, Lyst said searches for scarves have increased 15 percent with silk and printed scarves being the most wanted. Searches for “scarf top,” “bandana top” and “scarf halter top” in particular collectively increased 37 percent month-on-month.

And no surprise, masters at silk scarfs and prints including Versace, Emilio Pucci and Hermes are among the most popular brands for the versatile accessory.

Another summer classic is in high demand, too. Shorts have replaced sweatpants post-lockdown, Lyst reported, as the category has seen a “significant spike” in searches.

While comfort remains a priority, the types of shorts consumers are looking for are notably less influenced by loungewear.

Online searches for linen shorts have increased 28 percent this month, Lyst reported. Meanwhile, shoppers are also looking for tailored shorts, with fashion searches increasing 19 percent week-on-week.

And though fruity motifs and Hawaiian prints have each had their moment in the sun this summer, Lyst’s data indicates that shell motifs are gaining traction.

Over the past month searches that include the word “shell” have been rising and are currently up 33 percent week-on-week, Lyst reported. Consumers are looking for shell clutches, like Shrimp’s shell-shaped clutch made with faux pearls, and shell necklaces that have a souvenir look.

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