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High-End Children’s Wear Brand Wins PETA Vegan Fashion Award

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has awarded Germany’s Infantium Victoria with the PETA Vegan Fashion Award, the first it has given to a children’s wear brand.

The winning garment, the organic-cotton-clad “Princess Warrior” dress for girls, is a tulle-like maroon-colored confection with frilled cap sleeves. The neckline features a built-in fabric-bead necklace in a complementary strawberry hue.

Founded in 2014, Infantium Victoria specializes in high-end children’s clothing that draws from its founders’ “deep fascination for romantic themes and nostalgia,” as well as their professed dedication to a sustainable and cruelty-free lifestyle.

“We are looking to revolutionize kids’ wear by making it future-oriented, so we had no doubts about our line being fully organic, sustainable and vegan,” said Dinie van den Heuvel, the company’s co-founder and creative director, in a statement. “In fact, Infantium Victoria was one of the first children’s wear brands to receive PETA-approved vegan certification. We are very grateful to the jury appreciating children’s fashion and we will further on continue making vegan fashion mainstream.”

Infantium Victoria produces its pieces in Germany’s North Rhine-Westphalia region, Portugal, Spain and India based on patterns that are handmade at an atelier in Belgium. Partner suppliers, which are “100 percent Global Organic Textile Standard certified,” according to the brand, are selected based on their “track record for the sustainable utilization of resources, sound waste management, ethical working conditions and an independent monitoring of these key indicators,” the company notes on its website.

Its heirloom-inspired garments, the company adds, are both playful and sophisticated, making use of asymmetrical lines, contrasting fabrics and “whimsical details” to evoke the magic of childhood. Because Infantium Victoria believes only the “purest fibers” should come in contact with a child’s skin, it employs only cruelty-free, plant-based materials such as organic cotton, along with low-impact dyes.

“We are committed to strict adherence with the highest standards of manufacturing,” van den Heuvel said. “Every aspect of our supply chain—from fabrics to finishing—is mindfully considered for minimal environmental impact.”