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Backlash Against Balenciaga Goes Viral, Vandal and Conspiratorial

The backlash against Balenciaga’s controversial BDSM Teddy Bear ad campaign that featured young children continues to escalate, as vandals in London and Beverly Hills targeted Balenciaga storefronts Tuesday night, the U.K. Daily Mail reported.

In the London incident, a man could be seen on security cameras placing stickers on the windows that read ‘PAEDOPHELIA’, clearly in reference to the ad campaign.

Videos of the vandal placing the sticker while wearing a bright yellow security-type vest made the rounds on TikTok, which has become the preferred social networking platform for those protesting the perceived sexualization of children by destroying their own property.

In a self-inflicted purge perhaps not seen since the Milli Vanilli lip-synching scandal, customers of Balenciaga—and more importantly social media influencers—are taking to TikTok to cut up and throw away their not-so-cheap garments and handbags.

While TikTok appears to be the medium for protest, the home for conspiracy theories of international child sex slavery cabals, is Twitter.

Donald Trump Jr., the son of the former president tweeted, “There seems to be more outrage about @elonmusk making Free Speech & ridding Twitter of child pornography top priorities then there is about Balenciaga’s child porn/baby bondage scandal & the silence of virtually all the celebrities who represent that sick brand. Very telling!!!”

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Trump Jr. was one of many to call out celebrities who endorse Balenciaga.

Perhaps chief among those celebrities is Kim Kardashian, who on Sunday broke her silence about the ads by tweeting: “As for my future with Balenciaga, I am currently re-evaluating my relationship with the brand, basing it off their willingness to accept accountability for something that should have never happened to begin with — & the actions I am expecting to see them take to protect children.”

The Balenciaga blowback saga includes bizarre, obscure details that enable some conspiracy theorists to suspect there is nothing “accidental” or “unfortunate” about the campaign in its entirety.

Conservative commentator Glenn Beck tweeted, “You don’t just “accidentally” design and print a roll of tape that misspells Balenciaga as “BAALenciaga” (aka Moloch, god of child sacrifice) and “accidentally” put it in an ad with a child.” Beck was referring to a roll of yellow tape in the corner of one of the photos that appears to be spelled similarly to the name of the Canaanite god, whose moniker is synonymous with Beelzebub, aka, “Lord of the Flies.”

The yellow roll of tape appears identical to the full-body tape with the name’s brand in place of the word “CAUTION” that Kardashian wore to Balenciaga’s Paris fashion show in March.

Most notable among the “accidents” was the inclusion of a pile of court documents under a handbag in one of the photos. The court documents were from a U.S. Supreme Court case that addressed the question of whether the promotion of child pornography was protected speech.

That detail was the one cited in the lawsuit filed by Balenciaga in a New York U.S. District Court against the campaign’s set designer Nicholas Des Jardins and his North Six Inc. production company, that seeks $25 million in damages for tarnishing the Balenciaga brand.

In the two-page court document, Balenciaga attorneys wrote, “Inexplicable acts and omissions were malevolent or, at the very least, extraordinarily reckless. As a result of Defendants’ misconduct, members of the public, including the news media, have falsely and horrifically associated Balenciaga with the repulsive and deeply disturbing subject of the court decision.”

On Monday, Balenciaga took to Instagram to update its previous apology for the campaign, wanting to affirm it was the victim of what was perhaps an elaborate prank and not a promoter of the sexualization of young children.

“We strongly condemn child abuse; it was never our intent to include it in our narrative,” the statement said. “The two separate ad campaigns in question reflect a series of grievous errors for which Balenciaga takes responsibility.”