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This Week’s 8 Must Reads from Around the Web

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This week, retail’s double-edged effect on America, Nike’s alleged compliance abuse and Rent the Runway’s latest business feat all made headlines.

Retail’s demise is weighing on retail landlords. Executives from top mall companies, including Simon Property Group Inc. and GGP Inc., are experiencing compensation cutbacks as a result of shopping center vacancies, underperforming stock and competition from e-commerce companies. (The Wall Street Journal)

Related on SJ: Creditors Blame Private Equity for Retail Bankruptcies 

Jimmy Choo was recently snapped up by Michael Kors, but could this move boost the handbag tycoon’s sales? This article says Michael Kors will need to preserve Jimmy Choo’s value and focus less on store openings to ramp up its market presence. (Fortune)

Related on SJ: Michael Kors to Acquire Jimmy Choo for $1.2B

Although Nike has set out to improve its factories in the past, recent events, including layoffs at its Honduras factory and a ban on independent inspectors, have shed a negative light on the retailer’s compliance initiatives. (Fast Company)

Related on SJ: Bangladesh to Digitally Map Entire Garment Sector in Effort to Ensure Responsible Sourcing

Rent the Runway’s new same-day delivery service is enabling consumers to rent their dream dress in a pinch—and this model could give competitors, like Amazon, a run for their money because of its convenience appeal. (Glossy)

Related on SJ: Subscription Services Could be a Boon for Apparel—And Here’s Why

When it comes to footwear, a product’s origin could be on the backburner. Footwear insiders spoke about how while they support domestic manufacturing, most consumers don’t care so much about where their shoes are made—they are more concerned about working conditions, quality and price. (Highsnobiety)

Related on SJ:  Trump, Trade and How Companies are Reorganizing Their Footwear Supply Chain Strategies to Suit

Colette’s graceful bow from retail was shocking to many, but this article demonstrates how the Paris-based company decided to close doors rather than give up their authenticity and sell themselves to another fashion conglomerate. (Refinery 29)

Related on SJ: Store Closures Rampant? Maybe. Random? Definitely Not.

The fulfillment centers are coming—and they could be a boon for struggling towns. Companies like Amazon and Costco are expanding their centers nationwide, providing more jobs and boosting local economies despite concerns about retail’s uncertain state. (NBC News)

Related on SJ: Just How Much Time and Money Are Amazon’s Endless Fulfillment Centers Saving?

Migrant parent workers comprise a large part of China’s apparel industry, yet most companies don’t consider their family needs in the work environment. The Center for Child Rights & Corporate Social Responsibility (CCR CSR) found that if companies provided flexible time off policies and day-care facilities, workers are more likely to be better at their jobs. (Fashion Revolution)

Related on SJ: PVH Takes Corporate Responsibility Deeper Into Supply Chain

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