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Apparel Stories From Around the Web

This week, the apparel industry collaborated with automation, debated about Trump’s “Made in America” promise and elevated the in-store experience for consumers.

Nike is bringing on the heat in Florida’s retail landscape and opened Nike Miami, a new brick-and-mortar concept. Nike Miami will feature personalized services and an interactive digital Nike+ Running Trial Zone for shoppers.

(Related on SJ: How Uniqlo is Creatively Elevating its New York City Stores)

Textile machinery giant Karl Mayer debuted the HKS 4-M EL, a flexible machine that produces stylish, warp-knitted fabrics for fashionable apparel. With its versatile capabilities, the machine can also be used for other industries, including automotive and footwear.

(Related on SJ: Functional Fabrics in Full Effect at Texworld USA)

Supplier compliance service provider AsiaInspection (AI) acquired Produce Inspectors of America (PIA), an internhttps://sourcingjournalonline.com/uniqlo-creatively-elevating-new-york-city-stores/ational food product inspection company. The acquisition will foster AI’s footprint in North America, meanwhile PIA will bring its extensive food inspection solutions to produce farmers and retailers in the region.

(Related on SJ: ZDHC Debuts Digital Academy for Chemical Management Training)

Bangladesh’s economy received major assistance from GIZ, Germany’s development agency. Fibre2Fashion reported that GIZ will hone in on the nation’s textile and higher education spheres to create more textile jobs and improve textile education programs.

(Related on SJ: H&M Continues Recycling Initiative, Supports Refugee Children)

Related Stories

Walmart is fostering textile manufacturing innovation in 2017 with 34,000 new jobs, training for over 225,000 associates and $3 million in research grants to American universities.

(Related on SJ: Clemson University Receives $420,000 Grant to Advance Textile Manufacturing)

As the Trump Administration debates on tax proposals, The Wall Street Journal examined how the nation’s apparel retailers could be at stake, due to the possibility of tax imports becoming nondeductible expenses and a potential 35 percent levy on goods manufactured overseas.

(Related on SJ: Trump Proposes 20 Percent Tax on Imports from Mexico)

President Trump’s “Made in America” vision is dawning on the luxury sector and The Business of Fashion explored how Los Angeles’ manufacturing scene could be a potential boon for high-end apparel in coming years.

(Related on SJ: Nashville Plots Path Toward Fashion Capital Status)

The days of department stores are numbered and AdAge conducted a deep-dive on how national chains are losing ground to e-commerce, due to a lack of meaningful and personalized experiences for consumers.

(Related on SJ: Socially-Savvy Consumers Prioritize Trust in Retailer Relationships)

Glossy explained how plus-size e-tailers, including Eloquii, are honing in on brick-and-mortar experiences to fulfill consumer demands and bring digital branding to life for in-store shoppers.

(Related on SJ: Brands Amp Experiences on Social to Drive Apparel Business)

Is “Made in USA” losing ground in the greater fashion industry? The LA Times discussed how international buyers aren’t favoring American brands and how Trump’s U.S. manufacturing pledge could make “Made in America” less appealing to the global consumer demographic.

(Related on SJ: Trump Meets with US Manufacturers Over Jobs, Trade)

The French aren’t lighthearted when it comes to lingerie. Fashion United said a group of French people organized a show, “Lingerie, Mon Amour” (Lingerie, My Love), to rival the Victoria’s Secret fashion show in Paris and address the fact that elegance, not diamond-encrusted bras, is timeless when it comes to undergarments.

(Related on SJ: Making Lingerie for Every Body)

Seattle-based startup Sewbo introduced a new technology that created the world’s first-ever robotically sewn garment. Fast Company interviewed Sewbo founder Jonathan Zornow about how automation could benefit garment factories in the future.

(Related on SJ: World Economic Forum Discusses Robots’ Threat to Retail Jobs)