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India: National Green Tribunal Orders Closure of 739 Textile Factories

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India’s National Green Tribunal (NGT) circuit bench of Jodhpur has ordered the closure of 739 textile factories in Balotra, Jasol and Birthuia until July 9, while they renew consent to operate and obtain hazardous waste disposal authorization from the Rajasthan State Pollution Control Board (RSPCB), according to the Times of India.

These orders followed a joint common effluent treatment plant (CETP) inspection report completed by the Central Pollution Control Board and RSPCB that was submitted in court, stating that the CEPT has not been adhering to the rules laid by the pollution control boards regarding the consent to operate and the disposal of hazardous waste.

The joint report recommended installing adequate capacity reverse osmosis plants immediately to reuse the treated water in the member units and acquire land for the evaporation of reverse osmosis rejects.

NGT has directed the Prabodhan Samiti advocacy organization chaired by the district collector to regularly monitor the CETP and address any shortcomings of its operation or compliance with the rules.

The Tribunal also requested that a report outlining the textile units’ sources of water in Jodhpur and Pali be submitted by July 9.

Just last week it was reported that nearly 900 textile units in Sanganer were ordered to close by the RSPCB for failing to install CETPs, resulting in 18 million liters of untreated chemical water being discharged into the Drayvawati River everyday. The emissions have the potential to adversely affect the quality of both surface and ground water resources and could contribute to water-borne diseases like cholera and dysentery.

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