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Premiere Vision: Spring/Summer ’17 Trends Air on the Ethereal Side

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IMG_7897Falling right in line with the softer hues Pantone picked for the year’s colors, spring/summer ’17 trends are more delicate, less defined.

As Sabine Le Chatelier, Première Vision’s associate fashion director said at the New York show Tuesday, “This season is really marked by the idea of mobility, movement and new kinds of balances.”

Things will get a little “wonky” as a nod to the less conventional, a sort of organized chaos when it comes to textile patterns and prints, and many fabrics will maintain a fluid quality.

“Today, mobility has become more than just displacement, it’s a state of mind,” Le Chatelier explained.

There will be new ways of creating and combining fabrics and the instability of the mash-ups and patterns will be almost “seductive.”

New materials like Boeing’s microlattice, which it claims is made of 99.99% air and advancements in 3-D printing will influence textiles for the season.

There’s a new balance between tradition and today’s reality, with tech and textiles coming closer together, and trends for the season will be peppered with rawness, unfiltered beauty and more direct perceptions.

Beyond tapping into technology for inspiration, prints and patterns will channel the raw intensity of fruits and vegetables, airy elements and arithmetic geometry, like new takes on stripes that are larger and more uneven and color blocking in geometric patterns. Florals will stay put, making appearances in non-traditional places, like on leather.

“Flowers are the second biggest story of the season,” Le Chatelier said. But for spring/summer, the blooms will be edgier, more than organic.

In terms of color, Le Chatelier said, “It will be a very luminous and radiant season.” Muted colors reflecting skin tones and blushes will be key, as will energizing brights and sweet and spicy colors.

For fabrics, the trend will be all about transparency.

“The season is more about a modern interpretation of organza than chiffon,” Le Chatelier explained.

Transparent fabrics will still have substance and, according to Le Chatelier, will be more key for outerwear, not just for small tops as the trend has been in the past.

“It’s more like an extreme lightness,” she said. There will be ultra-fine cotton for shirting, translucent linen blends, shirts with pattern placements that have a see-through effect and ultra-light jersey. Translucent will also be a base for prints and patterns as a modern organdy.

Rudimentary weaves will also be prevalent, with a more contemporary interpretation aimed at outerwear and jackets. Fabrics will be spongy, rustic and rucksack-like but with a softer hand. Suiting will incorporate some of these more “lively” fabrics as the added texture and imperfections are now elegant and tell the story of bespoke, Le Chatelier said.

Distinct weaves and palpable vegetal sensations will also be present in fabrics for the season. Custom rayon will have a silky feel and come blended with cotton or linen.

“It’s in between chic and casual,” Le Chatelier said.

Washes will be more key in softening hand to make fabrics more casual, knits will share soft and natural hands and even fleece has become lighter, less round but more supple.

Looks that are obviously synthetic will pick up in popularity for spring/summer ’17, too.

Fabrics will gleam, have glassy reflections and transparent plastic looks as print fabric bases. Sparkling jersey, charmeuse, ultra stretch and polyamide lace in transparent filament will also make an appearance.

“Charmeuse and knits could make a big fashion statement,” Le Chatelier said. They will have lighter, more fluid hands and satisfy both the sport/casual market and higher fashion.

With the nod to casual increasingly apparent, cottons will come mixed with synthetics for a hyper-clean sensation, a fabric somewhere between denim and yoga pants. “The challenge is to keep neatness without being rigid there,” Le Chatelier said.

“We have a need for simplification, a reinterpretation of casual,” Le Chatelier said. “Every day scenes but reworked in a pop style.”

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