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Shipping Worker’s Crushed Pelvis and Leg Amputation Spark $156K OSHA Penalty Proposal

An employee working at a Chicago shipping facility suffered a leg amputation and crushed pelvis after he fell off and was then run over by a powered heavy-lift vehicle used to move and stack steel containers.

The 30-year-old recent hire suffered severe injuries after being allowed to ride unsecured on the vehicle. The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited ITS Technologies and Logistics LLC–operating as ITS Conglobal–for one willful violation and two serious violations, and proposed penalties totaling $156,038.

OSHA investigators found the intermodal cargo container shipping facility allowed employees to ride unsecured on a reach stacker in violation of company and OSHA safety procedures. In addition, ITS Conglobal failed to provide employees refresher training or evaluate them every three years on their ability to safely operate powered industrial vehicles, as required.

“This worker’s life-altering injuries could have been prevented if ITS Conglobal had followed its own and federal safety regulations against employees riding improperly on moving powered industrial vehicles,” OSHA Chicago South Area director James Martineck said. “Each year, hundreds of employees suffer injuries from powered industrial vehicle hazards and it remains one of OSHA’s top 10 cited safety standards. Employers must review and enforce workplace safety procedures.”

OSHA has specific regulations and required training for the operation of powered industrial vehicles. From 2011 to 2017, 614 workers lost their lives in forklift-related incidents and more than 7,000 nonfatal injuries with days away from work occurred every year.

Based in Darien, Ill., ITS ConGlobal is an intermodal infrastructure services provider for global and rail shipping. The company has about 4,000 employees in more than 120 facilities throughout the U.S., Mexico and Central America, and provides shipping services with North American railroads, global container shipping and leasing companies, and chassis operators.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance.