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Applied DNA Sciences Ships New Order to Document 10 Million Pounds of Cotton

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Applied DNA Sciences is making moves in the cotton sector.

The DNA-based supply chain genotyping provider announced Tuesday that it shipped a new order for SigNature T DNA, to document 10 million pounds of Acala cotton in 2016’s third quarter. Acala, an Upland cotton also known as Gossypium hirsutum. Some people claim it’s one of the highest quality cottons in the world.

“Authenticating Acala cotton with the SigNature T solution adds to our business momentum. This development comes at a very important time in the industry. Retailers, product developers and consumers are asking for more authenticity, especially with the sophistication of forensically-proven sourcing,” said chief executive and president of Applied DNA Dr. James Hayward. “In addition, with the recent decline of 50 percent in Egyptian production and the controversies surrounding its quality, Acala cotton is an excellent candidate to replenish the supply.”

Applied DNA is also receiving two new DNA transfer units that will support global gin expansion and additional cotton varieties for 2016’s fourth quarter. Both DNA transfer units will process Acala Upland and Texas cotton forms, while the initial four gins will continue processing Pima and Upland Delta cotton. The company is also discussing additional DNA Transfer Units with its customers, to address growing demands for ethically-sourced American cotton.

In addition, Applied DNA’s SigNature T solution used for PimaCott and HomeGrown continues to support transparency, traceability and trust for all involved in the cotton industry. Today, more than 260 companies have committed to The Cotton Pledge Against Forced Labor in the Cotton Sector. The U.S. Department of State is also pushing manufacturers to prove that slave labor is emitted from cotton sourcing.

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