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Commerce Finds Importers From Four Countries Dumped Polyester on US Market

The U.S. Commerce Department made affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber, finding that exporters from China, India, South Korea and Taiwan sold the goods at less than fair value.

As a result of the decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber from those countries. Foreign companies that price their products in the U.S. market below the cost of production or below prices in their home markets are subject to anti-dumping duties.

In the China investigation, Commerce calculated a preliminary dumping rate of 181.46% for Jiangyin Hailun Chemical Fiber Co. and 63.26% for Jiangyin Huahong Chemical Fiber Co. In the India investigation, Commerce calculated a preliminary dumping rate of 2.66% for Reliance Industries Ltd. and assigned a dumping rate of 21.43% to Bombay Dyeing & Manufacturing Co.

In the South Korea investigation, Commerce calculated a preliminary dumping rate of zero percent for Toray Chemical Korea Inc. a 45.23% rate for Down Nara Co. and Huvis Corp. Commerce, and a 30.15% rate for all other producers and exporters of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the country. In the Taiwan investigation, Commerce calculated a preliminary dumping rate of zero percent for Tainan Spinning Co., a rate of 48.86% for Far Eastern Textile Ltd., and 24.43% for all other producers and exporters of fine denier polyester staple fiber from Taiwan.

[Read more about Commerce investigations: Commerce Department Finds Unfair Subsidies on Polyester Fiber from China and India]

The petitioners are DAK Americas LLC of Charlotte, North Carolina, Nan Ya Plastics Corp. America of Lake City, South Carolina and Auriga Polymers Inc. of Spartanburg, North Carolina.

In 2016, U.S. imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, South Korea and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $79.4 million, $14.7 million, $10.6 million and $9.6 million, respectively.

“The U.S. values its relationships with these nations, but all of our trading partners must play by the rules,” said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “We will continue to review all information related to this preliminary determination while standing up for American businesses and workers.”

From Jan. 20 through Dec. 18, Commerce has initiated 79 antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, a 52 percent increase from 52 initiations in the previous year.

The AD law provides U.S. businesses and workers with an internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the harmful effects of unfair pricing of imports into the United States. Commerce currently maintains 412 antidumping and countervailing duty orders which provide relief to American companies and industries impacted by unfair trade.

Commerce is scheduled to announce its final determinations on or about May 11. If Commerce makes affirmative final determinations and the U.S. International Trade Commission makes affirmative final determinations that imports of fine denier polyester from China, India, South Korea and Taiwan materially injure or threaten material injury to the domestic industry, Commerce will issue AD orders. The ITC is scheduled to make its final injury determinations about 45 days after Commerce issues its final determinations, if affirmative.

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