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Amazon Recalls 15,000 Mattresses Over Fire Hazard Risk

Amazon has built a formidable portfolio of private-label brands but its AmazonBasics brand has been slapped with a product recall for the first time since 2019. In accordance with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the e-commerce giant is recalling 15,300 memory foam mattresses that pose a fire hazard to consumers, according to the commission’s mandate on Thursday.

Due to the violation of a federal flammability standard, the voluntary recall accounts for AmazonBasics memory foam mattresses sold between April 2020 and March 2021 for between $150 and $450. The recall includes mattresses in 10-inch and 12-inch sizes that were manufactured in twin, full, queen, king and California king sizes.

The mattresses, manufactured in Malaysia, are white with “AmazonBasics” printed on the foot panel and have a white federal label with “Amazon.com Services Inc.” identified as the importer. No incidents or injuries have been reported in relation to the recalled product.

Consumers won’t actually have to return the mattresses if they don’t want to, but instead can opt to register on Amazon to receive a free fitted mattress cover designed to ensure that the product meets the federal flammability requirements.

Amazon is contacting all purchasers to arrange for direct shipment of the cover.

“All customers who purchased these products have been notified and given instructions to register for and receive a free mattress cover to bring their mattress into compliance with the federal standard,” an Amazon spokesperson told Sourcing Journal. “If customers have any questions, they can contact Amazon toll-free at 1-877-444-3765 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.amazonmattressrecall.expertinquiry.com.”

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According to Amazon’s website, when the company learns of a recall, it stops all impacted product offerings, holds any related stock in its fulfillment centers and notifies all buyers and sellers of the products.

Authorities have been cracking down on items that violate federal flammability standards this year, with multiple Amazon-exclusive products being pulled from the market by the CPSC in recent months. However, unlike the mattresses, the goods sold on the e-commerce marketplace were not produced by Amazon, and instead by third-party sellers.

In June, multiple children’s nightgowns and robes sold exclusively on Amazon from the brands Auranso Official and Booph were recalled after it was discovered they violated federal flammability standards. Both manufactured in China, approximately 8,000 Auranso Official nightgowns and 4,900 Booph nightgowns were recalled, with neither situation resulting in a reported incident or injury.

One month later, nearly 6,000 sets of children’s pajamas from Tkala Fashion, which manufactures in Shenzhen, China, were pulled from Amazon for the same reason, with the CPSC specifically highlighting a risk of burn injuries to children. Like the previous instances, no injuries or incidents were reported.

Most recently, on Aug. 12, three separate sets of rugs were recalled that were sold by Amazon sellers—approximately 100 from Yoh, nearly 700 from Pacapet and roughly 375 from And Beyond. All fail to meet the federal flammability standard for carpets and rugs, posing a fire hazard.

Amazon hasn’t been the only company whose home textiles and apparel have been subject to a recall in recent times. Earlier this month, another young children’s wear and baby apparel retailer, Hanna Andersson, had to recall two items sold from July 2021 to October 2021 due to choking hazards from snaps that could detach from the garments. Roughly 4,400 Baby Long Sleeve Wiggle Sets were recalled, alongside 3,200 Baby Ruffle Rompers, with the CPSC recommending that customers immediately stop using the recalled product.

Hanna Andersson received three reported incidents of the snaps detaching or fabric around the snaps ripping for the wiggle sets, and one reported incident of snaps detaching from the rompers. No incidents of children putting snaps in their mouths or injuries have been reported. Both products are manufactured in Bangladesh.

The retailer contacted all known purchasers directly and is providing postage-paid labeling to consumers for the return of the product for a full refund.

Overseas, Matalan, the U.K.-based fashion and home goods retailer, had to pull a product of its own in October due to the potential of a choking hazard.

The retailer issued a recall for an infant clothing item, Panda Pocket Dungarees, for all that were purchased between June 14 and Oct. 7. Consumers could return the garment for a full refund, noting that “poppers” on the garment may become loose and present a choking hazard.