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Commerce Finds Fine Denier Polyester Fiber Dumped on US Market From Four Asian Nations

The U.S. Commerce Department has made affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, South Korea and Taiwan.

Commerce determined that exporters from the four Asian nations sold fine denier polyester staple fiber in the U.S. at less than fair value. Foreign companies that price their products in the U.S. market below the cost of production or below prices in their home markets are subject to AD duties.

The dumping margins determined by Commerce were 65.17% to 103.06% from China, 21.43% from India, zero to 45.23% from South Korea and zero to 48.86% from Taiwan. In the China investigation, Commerce calculated a dumping rate of 72.22% for Jiangyin Hailun Chemical Fiber Co. and 65.17% for Jiangyin Huahong Chemical Fiber Co., Ltd. The China-wide entity received a dumping rate of 103.06%, based on adverse facts available. An additional 14 companies demonstrated that they are independent from Chinese government control and Commerce granted them a separate rate equal to the simple average of the dumping rates.

In the India investigation, Commerce assigned a dumping rate of 21.43% to Reliance Industries Limited and Bombay Dyeing & Manufacturing Company, and to all other producers and exporters of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the country.

In the South Korea investigation, Commerce calculated a dumping rate of zero percent for Toray Chemical Korea Inc. and assigned a dumping rate of 45.23% to Down Nara Co. and Huvis Corp., and 30.15% for all other producers and exporters of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the country.

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In the Taiwan investigation, Commerce calculated a dumping rate of zero percent for Tainan Spinning Co. and assigned a dumping rate of 48.86% to Far Eastern Textile Ltd., and determined a dumping rate of 24.43% for all other producers and exporters of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the country.

The petition was filed by North Carolina companies DAK Americas LLC and Auriga Polymers Inc., and South Carolina firm Nan Ya Plastics Corp.

Commerce will now instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber those countries based on the final rates. In 2017, imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, South Korea and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $61.4 million, $23.7 million, $11.9 million and $7.4 million, respectively.

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is conducting investigations to determine whether the domestic industry is harmed by imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, South Korea and Taiwan. The ITC is scheduled to make its final injury determinations on or before July 9.

If the ITC makes affirmative final injury determinations, Commerce will issue AD orders. If the ITC makes negative final determinations of injury, the investigations will be terminated and no orders will be issued.

Commerce noted that it has initiated 114 new antidumping and countervailing duty investigations since the beginning of the Trump administration. The AD law provides U.S. businesses and workers with an internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the harmful effects of the unfair pricing of imports into the country. Commerce currently maintains 440 antidumping and countervailing duty orders.