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India Invests in Textiles Training in Nigeria

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India has set up shop in Nigeria to help train locals in apparel industry skills development.

A new textiles training center—the first of its kind in Nigeria—was established with the aid of the Nigerian government and opened in the city of Kaduna, a trade center and major transportation hub, last month.

The goal of the center will be to divulge information about best practices in textile production to Nigerian workers who will help improve and grow the local industry.

“The center is aimed to support and catalyze the initiative of Nigeria in realizing the objectives to rebuild the cotton and textile value chain and address the need for skilled workforce for domestic as well as export-oriented apparel industry in the West African region,” India’s Commerce Ministry said in a statement, according to The Statesman.

Nigeria’s president Muhammadu Buhari started a campaign and designated a committee to revive the country’s struggling cotton and textile industries last July to rekindle Nigeria’s garment industry. An influx of cheap textile materials, inconsistent government policies and the dumping of sub-standard textile materials helped to hurt the sector in years past.

There are currently more than 100 Indian companies with a presence in Nigeria across multiple sectors, including textiles, and the investment could be a sign of further growth to come for Nigeria.

In a report out last fall, A.T. Kearney ranked Nigeria among Africa’s most promising markets, calling it a logical entry point for starting sourcing as it’s still in the developing stage.

“By starting in the middle, a retailer could logically expand to other countries in different stages: to other developing markets by slightly adapting formats and assortments; up the curve by developing more targeted or larger assortments; or down the curve with a small dry goods assortment,” the report said.

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